Alimony

UNDERSTANDING ALIMONY

How does alimony in Wisconsin work?

Alimony is set up to make sure both spouses avoid the negative economic effects that come from a Wisconsin divorce. In most marriages, both spouses typically enjoy a certain standard of living that is higher than if they were both single. Wisconsin family law dictates that no spouse should be come out of a divorce in a more advantageous financial position. Alimony in a Madison divorce is also called “maintenance,” or “spousal maintenance.” A trained divorce attorney can explain more of the legal basis behind alimony. To estimate your alimony payments check out our Alimony Payment Calculator.

 

Alimony

When you need changes to your alimony order.

Usually, the alimony decisions made by Wisconsin county courts are final. But there are particular circumstances that could change the amount of alimony you or your spouse pays. One of the most common reasons for changing alimony is an increase or decrease in salary. If one partner becomes unable to pay due to financial hardship, alimony can be changed. Alimony can also be changed if an ex-spouse remarries, or even moves in with someone else. Under Wisconsin family law, alimony payments can really only be modified if a spouse’s circumstances change significantly

 

Alimony

Terminating alimony in Wisconsin

There are really only two valid reasons for terminating alimony in Wisconsin. The first reason, of course, is death. But spousal maintenance or alimony can also be terminated in the event that one spouse remarries. According to standard Wisconsin family law practice, the courts see marriage as an increase in standard of living. Therefore, the newly married spouse will have an adequate financial safety net from his or her new marriage. In addition to death or marriage, major changes in standard of living or a major inheritance can also cause alimony to be terminated.

 

Alimony

UNDERSTANDING ALIMONY

How does alimony in Wisconsin work?

Alimony is set up to make sure both spouses avoid the negative economic effects that come from a Wisconsin divorce. In most marriages, both spouses typically enjoy a certain standard of living that is higher than if they were both single. Wisconsin family law dictates that no spouse should be come out of a divorce in a more advantageous financial position. Alimony in a Madison divorce is also called “maintenance,” or “spousal maintenance.” A trained divorce attorney can explain more of the legal basis behind alimony. To estimate your alimony payments check out our Alimony Payment Calculator.

When you need changes to your alimony order.

Usually, the alimony decisions made by Wisconsin county courts are final. But there are particular circumstances that could change the amount of alimony you or your spouse pays. One of the most common reasons for changing alimony is an increase or decrease in salary. If one partner becomes unable to pay due to financial hardship, alimony can be changed. Alimony can also be changed if an ex-spouse remarries, or even moves in with someone else. Under Wisconsin family law, alimony payments can really only be modified if a spouse’s circumstances change significantly

Terminating alimony in Wisconsin

There are really only two valid reasons for terminating alimony in Wisconsin. The first reason, of course, is death. But spousal maintenance or alimony can also be terminated in the event that one spouse remarries. According to standard Wisconsin family law practice, the courts see marriage as an increase in standard of living. Therefore, the newly married spouse will have an adequate financial safety net from his or her new marriage. In addition to death or marriage, major changes in standard of living or a major inheritance can also cause alimony to be terminated.

Divorce Basics

What you need to know

To file a divorce in Wisconsin, you must meet basic residency requirements. You can start the process of getting a divorce by filing with the clerk in your particular county. In order to file for divorce, you only have to acknowledge that your marriage is broken beyond repair. A divorce attorney can make sure you stay organized as you begin the divorce process. Filing a divorce action in the appropriate manner is crucial in having a successful divorce.

Alimony

Child Custody

What you need to know

In most family law cases, courts try to maximize a child’s time with both parents after a divorce. However, the parent with legal custody still gets to make crucial decisions on behalf of the child. Courts do consider each parent’s relationship with the children in a divorce, and they also take the child’s wishes into account in most cases. In the absence of legal custody, a divorce attorney can still make sure you play a role in the life of your child after a divorce.

Alimony

Child Support

What you need to know about child support

Wisconsin courts have specific rules for setting child support amounts. Child support amounts typically last until a child is an adult and can only be changed under very specific circumstances. Therefore, it’s important that you end up paying the right amount in child support from the very beginning. If you believe your former spouse in a divorce isn't paying the right amount in child support, a divorce attorney can help you address this situation.

Alimony

Alimony

What you need to know about alimony

In a divorce, Wisconsin courts aim to establish financial equality between spouses. Alimony, or spousal maintenance, is the main way courts do this. There is such a thing as temporary alimony, but most alimony orders are permanent, so it’s important that spouses have a bold legal advocate to argue their case in a divorce trial. Although marriage is supposed to be a give-and-take, oftentimes one spouse sacrifices more than the other during a marriage. Factors such as these can influence how much alimony is paid after a divorce is finalized.

Alimony

Property Division

What you need to know about property division

Wisconsin family law guidelines are pretty clear-cut when it comes to property division during a divorce. Although there are exceptions, assets are usually split evenly. Still, property division can get pretty complicated. Dishonest spouses will hide or undervalue marital assets to cheat the other party out of his or her fair share. In property division cases, a divorce attorney will help you avoid being taken advantage of. Many types of assets, including ones you probably never thought of, can be divided during the divorce process.

Alimony

THE ALIMONY SETTLEMENT

How courts determine alimony

Before an alimony settlement can be agreed upon in a Wisconsin divorce, the courts, will look at several factors pertaining to both spouses. A good divorce attorney can assertively present a client’s case in court and ensure a fair alimony settlement. The most important factor the court looks at is the length of the marriage. Most of the time, 10 years is the limit – for marriages shorter than 10 years, the court may not be likely to award alimony. If one spouse has a large amount of individual property, the court may also award alimony. Age, emotional health and education levels also come into play when for the courts.

Presenting your alimony case

Clients have to prepare to present their alimony case to the court in a divorce battle. To prepare, they should bring a written history detailing employment as well as educational background. Most Madison divorce attorneys also tell spouses to bring their tax returns from the marriage, as well as financial documents verifying the value of other assets like luxury items and other significant holdings. The process can be cumbersome, but it’s far worse to be stuck with an unfair alimony payment after a divorce. A divorce attorney like John T. Fields & Associates will help you prepare the right documents and he has the experience needed to help win your case

Understanding the different types of alimony

Of course, not all alimony is created equally. In alimony settlements, there are many different types of alimony payments. In addition to permanent alimony, which usually lasts until a spouse remarries or dies, there is also temporary alimony. Usually, this type of alimony in a divorce case is awarded to a lower-earning spouses to help him or her with expenses until the divorce is finalized. There is also lump-sum alimony, or alimony that is paid all at once, usually soon after a divorce is finalized. This saves one spouse the headache of worrying about alimony payments over time.

THE ALIMONY SETTLEMENT

Alimony

How courts determine alimony

Before an alimony settlement can be agreed upon in a Wisconsin divorce, the courts, will look at several factors pertaining to both spouses. A good divorce attorney can assertively present a client’s case in court and ensure a fair alimony settlement. The most important factor the court looks at is the length of the marriage. Most of the time, 10 years is the limit – for marriages shorter than 10 years, the court may not be likely to award alimony. If one spouse has a large amount of individual property, the court may also award alimony. Age, emotional health and education levels also come into play when for the courts.

 

Alimony

Presenting your alimony case

Clients have to prepare to present their alimony case to the court in a divorce battle. To prepare, they should bring a written history detailing employment as well as educational background. Most Madison divorce attorneys also tell spouses to bring their tax returns from the marriage, as well as financial documents verifying the value of other assets like luxury items and other significant holdings. The process can be cumbersome, but it’s far worse to be stuck with an unfair alimony payment after a divorce. A divorce attorney like John T. Fields & Associates will help you prepare the right documents and he has the experience needed to help win your case.

 

Alimony

Understanding the different types of alimony

Of course, not all alimony is created equally. In alimony settlements, there are many different types of alimony payments. In addition to permanent alimony, which usually lasts until a spouse remarries or dies, there is also temporary alimony. Usually, this type of alimony in a divorce case is awarded to a lower-earning spouses to help him or her with expenses until the divorce is finalized. There is also lump-sum alimony, or alimony that is paid all at once, usually soon after a divorce is finalized. This saves one spouse the headache of worrying about alimony payments over time.

 

AlimonyJohn Fields was tirelessly devoted to our divorce case. Well organized and professional staff, they were always helpful and available. We had a great outcome because of the expert knowledge and experience that he provided. Definitely recommended! .

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AlimonyNeeded an aggressive attorney and found one in Attorney Fields. He’s great at getting what you want from a highly contested divorces.

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Alimony

740 Pilgrim Pkwy, Suite 100
Elm Grove, WI53122

608-819-5890
CALL TODAY

740 Pilgrim Parkway, Ste 100 Elm Grove, WI 53122

608-819-5890 CALL TODAY